Category Archives: Women Feminine Care

Women’s Feminine Health: Vulva and Vaginal

Katha-Soma chair

The Kátha-Soma Health Blog (originated Jan 2013) provides dialogue about women’s gynecologic health.  Some of the women’s health conditions related include:

● Vulva Vaginal Changes With Age
● Postmenopause Vulva and Vagina Changes (part one and part two)
● What is Vulvodynia?
● What is Vulvar Dystrophy?
● What is Vulvitis?
● Sexual Arousal in the Vulva
● Vulva Eczema

Keirā Feminine to soothe labia/vulva skin.

Keirā Feminine to soothe labia/vulva skin.

Keirá Feminine Cream provides relief for women with vulva dryness, inflammatory vulvodynia, vulva psoriasis, vulva dermatitis/eczema, lichen sclerosis, and Sjogren’s Syndrome. Keirá is also formulated for post menopause labia/vulva dryness, and women with cancer treatment induced labia/vulva dryness. To learn more about Keirá Feminine Cream click here.

A few health conditions are noted below, for more detailed information about each condition see the specific blog section or use the search bar.

 The Vulva is a woman’s outside genital area, the vagina is a woman’s internal genital. The vulva and vagina have different cell/tissue structure. A woman’s vagina consists of three layers of tissue: the epithelium, the lamina propria and the muscularis. Vulva skin consists of three primary layers: the epidermis, the dermis and the hypodermis. When estrogen levels are low the vulvar and vagina tissue become thinner and fragile resulting in symptoms and discomfort.

● Vulvitis is not a disease, but refers to the inflammation of the soft folds of skin on the outside of the female genitalia, the vulva.

 Vulvodynia is the medical term used to describe unexplained and persistent pain in a woman’s genital area (the vulva).

 Vulvar Vestibulitis pain. irritation to the area surrounding the entrance to the vagina (introitus).

Vaginismus the muscle walls of the vagina contract or spasm in response to attempted insertion, for example with a tampon or penis.

 Dyspareunia painful intercourse; often due to low levels of estrogen, such as post menopause.

 Atrophy is a medical term meaning the tissue becomes thin and fragile (much like when fabric or the sole of a shoe wears away). For example, after menopause due to diminished estrogen production from the ovaries, the vulva losses thickness/padding and natural moisture contributing to dryness and discomfort for many post-menopause women.

 Pelvic Congestion Syndrome: enlarged/swollen varicose type veins around the uterus and ovaries.

Kátha-Soma also offers medicinal therapeutics to address health conditions such as rosacea, psoriasis, lupus, scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis. To learn about each of Kátha-Soma therapeutic’s visit  www.Katha-Soma.com

The Kátha-Soma skin care therapeutics  help people living with serious illness or slow cell renewal due to aging, minimize their signs & symptoms, achieve daily comfort and maintain quality of life.

DISCLAIMER: Kátha-Soma does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. The information provided is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with a qualified health care provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. USA/2014

 

Vulva Vaginal Changes With Age

The vulva (external genital area) and vagina (internal) contain the largest tissue concentration of estrogen receptors in the female body. As a girl goes through puberty, the ovaries start producing estrogen. The vulva labia majora and labia minora thicken and develop, the mons pubis elevates, and internal genital organs develop. The vagina matures and develops a multilayered epithelium with rugae, or folds of tissue facilitating distention during sex/intercourse.

The pH of the vagina becomes acidic, around 3.5 or lower, indicating the presence of hydrogen peroxide producing lactobacilli. Lactobacillus is a bacterium normally found in the mouth, intestinal tract, and vagina. These protective bacteria keep pathogens at bay, ensuring the healthy vaginal microflora. Normal vaginal secretions are relatively odor free, thin, and non irritating.

After menopause (no menstrual period for 1 year), estrogen levels decline significantly. As a result of low estrogen, the labia minora (inner folds) lose fullness and become thin. The vaginal opening (introitus) can become less flexible and more narrow, making intercourse painful (dyspareunia). The vaginal lining (epithelium) also becomes thin and fragile. Rugation (folds of tissue) decrease, making the vagina shorter and narrower . . . another contributor to dyspareunia.

Additionally, for postmenopausal women the vagina pH increases, as lactobacilli decrease due to diminished estrogen production. Consequences may include vaginitis from flora and Escherichia coli colonization of the urethra, placing postmenopausal women at higher risk of urinary tract infections: bacteria overgrowth in the urethra and/or bladder. Maintaining optimum lactobacillus levels reduces vulnerability to urinary & bladder infections because the lactobacillus naturally neutralize bacteria overgrowth.

Cystitis (inflammation of the bladder wall), and Interstitial Cystitis (same symptoms as an urinary infection but involves chronic bladder inflammation not related to bladder infection) are also conditions that post menopausal women are more vulnerable to as a consequence of diminished estrogen production. Prior to menopause estrogen had supported the structure and function of the bladder.

Unlike hot flashes, and heart palpitations which tend to ease during the menopause transition, vulva and/or vaginal atrophy does not lessen over time. This is because the vulva and vaginal structure have changed with age as a direct result of diminished ovarian estrogen production.

It is helpful to distinguish the vulva from the vagina because these genital areas have different tissue structure and function. Vagina discomfort is felt with penetration . . . during intercourse. Labia dryness, vulva discomfort can be felt throughout the day.

Keirá Feminine to soothe labia/vulva skin.

Keirá Feminine to soothe labia/vulva skin.

Keirá  is a non hormonal feminine ointment that supports labia moisture and vulva tissue to address symptoms of vulva atrophy (dry, thin fragile tissue). For post menopause women daily use of Keirá Feminine Ointment  replaces  labia moisture for comfort and also supports clitoris tissues to enhance sensitivity: arousal and pleasure.  To learn more about Keirá Feminine click here.

Note:  Low estrogen due to menopause can diminish physiologic responses associated with sexual arousal including smooth muscle relaxation, vasocongestion (blood pooling creates the warmth/heat sensation during arousal and orgasm), and vulva vaginal lubrication (milky like secretion).

Dyspareunia is a medical term for pain with sexual intercourse.

DISCLAIMER: Keirá Feminine Ointment is manufactured and distributed by Kátha Soma Consumer Healthcare. Kátha Soma does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. The information provided is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.  Kátha Soma Consumer Health USA 2014-16.

Postmenopause Vulva and Vagina Changes (part one)

The structure and function of women’s genitalia are highly dependent on the sex steroid hormonal milieu. As a woman ages or a young woman is exposed to medicines that interfere with the hormonal milieu (eg oral contraceptives, tamoxifene), her supply of sex steroid hormones (estradiol, testosterone and progesterone) diminishes significantly. During menopause, ovarian estradiol production ceases. However, estrogen does continue to be synthesized in the periphery (eg, skin, adipose tissue, bone, muscle) in postmenopausal women through conversion of androstenedione to estrone and testosterone to estradiol; the amount of estradiol synthesized depends, in part, on the enzymatic activity of aromatase.

Estrogens and androgens are required for genital tissue structure and function. These hormones act on estrogen and androgen receptors, respectively, which exist in high numbers in genital tissues, including the epithelial/endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells of the vagina, vulva, vestibule, labia, and urethra. Diminished estrogen production renders women’s genital tissues highly susceptible to atrophy (thin, fragile structure).

Physical examination of the postmenopausal woman’s genitalia shows clitoral atrophy, *phimosis, and nearly absent labia minora. The appearance of a woman’s labia minora mirrors her level of estrogen (estradiol), because these labia are exquisitely sensitive to estrogen (estradiol).

The urogenital area termed the vestibule is very important in female sexual function because it contains organs that are sensitive to both estrogen and androgen. For example, the clitoral tissues and prepuce (the hood that covers the clitoris) are androgen sensitive. The minor vestibular glands, which are located in the labial-hymenal junction are also androgen dependent. The glands of Littre are located on the anterior (front) surface of the urethra.

A host of structural changes and cellular dysfunctions can occur in women’s genital tissues as a result of low estrogen. For example, estrogen deficiency specifically in the vagina leads to vaginal atrophy. One consequence is an alteration in the normally acidic vaginal pH that discourages the growth of pathogenic bacteria. The change to an alkaline pH value in the atrophic vagina leads to a shift in the vaginal flora, increasing the likelihood of discharge and odor. In an estrogen-rich environment, glycogen from sloughed epithelial cells is hydrolyzed into glucose and then metabolized to lactic acid by normal vaginal flora. In postmenopausal women, however, epithelial thinning of the vaginal tissue reduces the available glycogen.

In addition to vaginal atrophy and a reduction in organ size, other signs of a decline in sex hormones in women include: vaginal dryness; no secretions or lubrication; pale or inflamed tissue; petechiae; epithelial/mucosal thinning; organ prolapse; changes in external genitalia; decreased tissue elasticity and loss of smooth muscle. Symptoms of women’s sexual health concerns that  a clinician may elicit when taking a history in a menopausal woman are: dyspareunia, vaginismus, coital anorgasmia, vaginal and/or urinary tract infections (pH imbalance), overactive bladder/incontinence.

 The vulva is a woman’s external genital area. It includes two hair covered folds of skin called the labia majora, which surround two thin inner folds called the labia minora. The labia majora and labia minora surround the clitoris, the opening of the vagina and the urethra, the tube through which urine is passed.

Phimosis is when the clitoral hood does not retract limiting exposure to the glans of the clitoris. Petechiae are tiny pinpoint like, round spots that appear on the skin as a result of bleeding under the skin.

* Estrogen deficiency also interferes with many physiologic responses associated with sexual arousal, including smooth muscle relaxation, vasocongestion, and vaginal lubrication.

 

Sourced From:
BIOLOGY OF FEMALE SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION
Copyright © 2007 San Diego Sexual Medicine
San Diego, California 92120

DISCLAIMER: Kátha Soma does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. The information provided is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

Postmenopause Vulva and Vagina Changes (part two)

A woman’s vagina consists of 3 layers of tissue: the epithelium (composed of squamous cells), the lamina propria, and the muscularis (inner circular and outer longitudinal smooth muscle). The epithelium undergoes mild changes during the menstrual cycle. The lamina propria is replete/supplied with tiny blood vessels that become engorged with blood during sexual arousal, leading to lubrication. The smooth muscle of the muscularis enables the vagina to dilate and lengthen during penile penetration. Relaxation of that muscle leads to arousal. These 3 layers of tissue may function in an interrelated way. It is hypothesized that the blood vessels in the lamina propria that allow for lubrication are dependent on growth factors, and that the growth factors are derived from the muscularis. Postmenopausal atrophy (weakness) of vaginal tissues may be due to decreased synthesis these growth factors resulting in diminished number of critical blood vessels in the lamina propria.

Controlled studies employing a rat model of vaginal atrophy demonstrated the effects of different dosages of estrogen, progestin, testosterone, and various combinations of these hormones on various physiologic and anatomic outcome parameters. These measures included organ wet weight, vaginal blood flow, epithelial height, muscularis thickness, and vaginal innervation. In each study, the effects on the vagina of different dosages of the hormone being tested were compared between rats that had undergone sham ovariectomies and rats that had actually had both ovaries removed. The hormones (or saline) were delivered through a pump inserted into the back of the neck of each animal. A Doppler probe inserted into the vagina was used to record blood flow after electrical stimulation of a nerve next to the vagina. All animals were then euthanized and vaginal tissue removed for biochemical or histologic studies. In those animal studies, removal of the ovaries reduced the wet weight of the uterus that rose with administration of estrogen because the uterus is a very estrogen-sensitive organ, much more so than the vagina.

Increased vaginal blood flow is an indicator of sexual arousal. Genital swelling and lubrication are responses to increased clitoral and vaginal perfusion; increased length and diameter of the vaginal canal and clitoral corpora cavernosa; engorgement of the vagina wall, clitoris, and labia major and minora; and transudation of lubricating fluid from the vaginal epithelium. In the animal studies just described, blood flow to the vagina was greatly reduced in the oophorectomized rats compared with the intact rats.

Contrary to what one might expect, subphysiologic (lower) doses of estradiol increased vaginal blood flow in oophorectomized (removal of ovaries) rats more than either physiologic or supraphysiologic (higher) doses. Ovariectomy deprived the rats of estradiol, causing the vaginal epithelium to thin down to a single layer. Subphysiologic doses of estradiol increased the thickness of the vaginal epithelium the most because the oophorectomized rats had more estrogen-alpha receptors in the epithelium than the intact animals. A small amount of estradiol delivered to tissue with many estrogen-alpha receptors produced a huge response. Thus, estradiol regulates estrogen receptors through a negative feedback system. The more estradiol that is available, the fewer estrogen receptors there are. The muscularis, the muscle that enables the vagina to lengthen and widen during sexual arousal, also atrophies without estrogen. In postmenopausal women who do not take hormone therapy, the vaginal epithelium, lamina propria blood vessels, and muscularis all decrease. Like the epithelium, the muscularis responds to estradiol by increasing in thickness.

Sourced From:
BIOLOGY OF FEMALE SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION
Copyright © 2007 San Diego Sexual Medicine
San Diego, California 92120

Sexual Arousal Changes in the Vulva

Sexual arousal results in a number of physical changes to the labia/vulva area. Arousal may be broken up into four phases: Excitement, Plateau, Orgasm, and Resolution.

Excitement
Vaginal lubrication begins first. This is caused by vasocongestion of the vaginal walls. Increased blood pooling there causes moisture to seep from the vaginal walls. These droplets collect together and flow out of the vagina, moistening the vulva. The labia majora flatten and spread apart, and the clitoris and labia minora increase in size.

Plateau
Increased vasocongestion in the vagina causes it to swell, decreasing the size of the vaginal opening by about 30%. The clitoris becomes increasingly erect, and the glans moves towards the pubic bone, becoming concealed by the hood. The labia minora increase considerably in thickness, approximately 2–6 times, causing them to spread apart, displaying the vaginal opening. The labia minora are two soft folds of skin within the labia majora.

Orgasm
Immediately prior to the female orgasm, the clitoris becomes exceptionally engorged, causing the glans to appear to pull back into the clitoral hood. This is thought to protect the sensitive glans during orgasm.

During a woman’s orgasm, rhythmic muscle contractions occur in the outer third (opening) of the vagina, as well as the uterus and anus. They occur initially at a rate of about one every 0.8 seconds, becoming less intense and more randomly spaced as the orgasm continues. An orgasm may have as few as one or as many as 15 or more contractions, depending on its intensity. Orgasm may be accompanied by female ejaculation, causing liquid from either the Skene’s gland or bladder to be expelled through the urethra.

Immediately after orgasm the clitoris may be so sensitive that any stimulation is either exciting or uncomfortable.

Histamine is a chemical that helps trigger an orgasm. Histamine is also released during an orgasm. Folic acid (folate) regulates the production of histamine. Enjoying foods rich in folate helps increase libido, sexual intensity and pleasure. Deficiencies of L-Histidine also effect histamine levels.

Without the free passage of blood cells to the sex organs, sexual sensation decreases. Proper blood flow allows labia/vulva tissues to become engorged, aroused and lubricated. Relaxed blood vessels increase blood flow (for men & women), this is why yoga and exercise that focuses on the pelvic area enhances sexual arousal and pleasure.

Pheromones are odorless chemical signals released through sweat glands; once “smelled,” pheromones tend to affect (arouse) the behavior of one’s sexual partner.

Keira SomaAbout the Labia, Vulva, Clitoris
The vulva has many major and minor anatomical structures, including the labia majora, mons pubis, labia minora, clitoris, bulb of vestibule, vulvar vestibule, greater and lesser vestibular glands, and the opening of the vagina.

Clitoris Sensitivity
A woman’s clitoris is exquisitely sensitive because the clitoris contains at least 8,000 sensory nerve endings. One quarter of the clitoris is visible; the rest of clit, nib is inside the body. The clitoris is made up of many different parts, including the clitoral head, the hood the clitoral shaft, the urethral sponge, erectile tissue, glands, vestibular bulbs and the crura (or the clitoral legs).

Oral lips, Penis, Clitoris and Nipples are very sensitive
Pacini’s corpuscles are mechanoreceptors designed to detect pressure.They populate the oral lips, penis, clitoris, and nipples. Pacini’s corpuscles are located in the deep portion of the dermis (middle skin layer) and in the subcutaneous fat (bottom skin layer).

Soma-Sensual™ for noticeably soft, smooth sensual curves

Soma-Sensual™ for noticeably soft, smooth sensual curves

Soma-Sensual™ is a nutrient enriched replenishing butter to soften & smooth the skin on the buttocks, the gluteal crease (the semi curve where the back of the thigh meets cheek) and the uppermost inner thigh (erogenous zone). CLICK HERE to learn more about Soma-Sensual™.

Erogenous Zone an area of the body that has heightened sensitivity, the stimulation of which may generate a sexual response, such as relaxation, the production of sexual fantasies, sexual arousal and orgasm.

Soma-Sensual™ is sold exclusively via e-commerce by Kathá Soma Consumer Healthcare USA, 2015-16

DISCLAIMER: Kathá Soma skin care therapeutics are formulated for people with vulnerable and troubled skin. Kindly note, the content presented in this website is not intended as, or should be construed as medical advice. Please consult with your healthcare practitioner for individual medical recommendations.

Vaginal Vulva Dryness Menopause

The vulva the external genital of the female includes the mons pubis, labia majora, labia minora, clitoris, vestibule and vestibular glands of the vagina. Except the mons pubis and labia majora vulva surfaces are lined by a moist stratified squamous epithelium. This natural moisture keeps the labia, vulva area comfortable and functioning well (much like moisture keeps the eyes comfortable).

Vulvovaginal atrophy is a common condition, especially in postmenopausal women. Vaginal atrophy, atrophic vaginitis, and urogenital atrophy are other terms used to describe a constellation of symptoms associated with decreased estrogenization of the vulvovaginal tissue.

Common symptoms include vaginal dryness, irritation, light bleeding and soreness after sex. These symptoms may be associated with vaginal discharge and dyspareunia (painful intercourse). Urinary symptoms associated with vulvovaginal atrophy include frequency, urgency, and urge incontinence.

Clinical findings include atrophy (thinning) of the labia majora and vaginal opening (introitus). The labia minora may recede. Vulvar and vaginal mucosae may appear pale, shiny, and dry; if there is inflammation, the vulva and/or vagina tissue may appear reddened or pale with petechiae. Vaginal rugae disappear, and the cervix may become flush with the vaginal wall. Vaginal shortening and narrowing tend to occur. Petechiae are tiny pinpoint spots that appear on the skin as a result of bleeding under the skin.

Vulvovaginal atrophy can occur at any time in a woman’s life cycle, although it is more common in the postmenopausal phase; a time of low estrogen (hypo-estrogenism). Other causes of a hypo-estrogenic state include lactation, various breast cancer treatments (Arimidex, Tamoxifen), and use of certain medications. In situations other than menopause, vulvovaginal may resolve spontaneously when estrogen levels are restored.

Numerous retrospective studies have evaluated the prevalence of symptoms of VVA. Although these studies differ in type of symptoms elicited, study design, and study population, they provide a range of estimates of vulvovaginal atrophy prevalence. They all used self-reported symptoms of vaginal dryness to determine the prevalence of VVA. In general, the prevalence ranged from about 4% in the early premenopausal groups to 47% in the late postmenopausal group.

The prevalence of vulvovaginal atrophy in some subgroups of women can be much higher. In a cohort of breast cancer survivors, vaginal dryness was present in 23.4% of the premenopausal patients and in 61.5% of the postmenopausal patients.

Vulvovaginal atrophy occurs under conditions of low estrogen (hypoestrogenism).
●  premenopausal estradiol levels fluctuate from 10 to 800 pg/mL depending on when measured during the menstrual cycle.
●  postmenopausal estradiol levels are typically less than 30 pg/mL.
After menopause, circulating estradiol derives from estrone, which is peripherally converted in fat tissue from adrenal androstenedione.

Vaginal Structure and Function
The vaginal epithelium is a stratified squamous epithelium, which until menopause is moist and thick with rugae. At menopause, with declining levels of estrogen, the vaginal epithelium thins. Fewer epithelial cells result in less exfoliation of cells into the vagina. As epithelial cells exfoliate and die, they release glycogen, which is hydrolyzed to glucose. Glucose, in turn, is broken down into lactic acid by the action of lactobacillus, a normal vaginal commensal organism. Without this cascade, the pH in the vagina rises, resulting in a loss of lactobacilli and an overgrowth of other bacteria, including group B streptococcus, staphylococci, coliforms, and diphtheroids. These bacteria can cause symptomatic vaginal infections and inflammation. After menopause, the elasticity of the vagina is reduced and connective tissue increases. A decline in estrogen level causes a decrease in vaginal blood flow and a decrease in vaginal lubrication.

The effects of endogenous estrogens on vulvovaginal tissues are mediated through estrogen receptors (ERs) α and β, found at sites throughout the urogenital area, including the vagina, vulva, labia, urethra, and bladder trigone.

Above Info Sourced from: Vulvovaginal Atrophy
Maire B. Mac Bride, MBBCh, Deborah J. Rhodes, MD, and Lynne T. Shuster, MD.  Mayo Clin Proc. 2010 January; 85(1): 87–94.

Helpful Note: Unlike hot flashes, and heart palpitations which tend to ease during the menopause transition, vulva and/or vaginal atrophy does not lessen over time. This is because the vulva and vaginal structure have changed as a direct result of diminished ovarian estrogen production due to menopause.

It is helpful to distinguish the vulva from the vagina because these genital areas have different tissue structure and function. Vagina discomfort is felt with penetration . . . during intercourse. Vulva, labia dryness, irritation and soreness can be felt throughout the day.

keira-sensual

Keirá is a non hormonal feminine ointment developed by Kátha Soma. As a post menopause therapeutic Keirá Feminine Ointment supports the structure and function of labia/vulva tissue to address symptoms of labia, vulva atrophy (dry fragile tissue). CLICK HERE to learn more about Keirá Feminine Ointment. Keirā maintaining labia, clitoris sensitivity & comfort, naturally.

Soma-Sensual™ is a nutrient enriched replenishing butter to soften & smooth the skin on the buttocks, the gluteal crease (the semi curve where the back of the thigh meets cheek) and the uppermost inner thigh (erogenous zone). CLICK HERE to learn more about Soma-Sensual™.

DISCLAIMER: Kátha Soma does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. The information provided is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

Sjögren’s Syndrome Vulva, Labia, Vaginal Dryness

Sjögren’s syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disease in which a person’s white blood cells attack their moisture producing glands. The female to male ratio of Sjögren syndrome is 9:1. Onset typically occurs in the fourth to fifth decade of life; which is about the same time women are going through the menopause transition.

The main symptoms of Sjögren’s syndrome are:
Dry eyes
Eyes affected by Sjögren’s syndrome may burn or itch. Some people say it feels like they have sand in their eyes. Others have trouble with blurry vision, or are bothered by bright light, especially fluorescent lighting. 

Dry mouth
Dry mouth may feel chalky or like your mouth is full of cotton. It may be difficult to swallow, speak, or taste.

Sjögren’s syndrome can also affect other parts of the body, contributing to symptoms such as:
multiple sites of joint and muscle pain
prolonged dry skin
chronic dry lips
skin rashes on the extremities
chronic dry cough
● labia dryness, vulva dryness and discomfort
numbness or tingling in the extremities
prolonged fatigue that interferes with daily life.

The labia minora** are the soft inner skin folds (lips) that cover the vaginal opening, the urethra opening and the clitoris. As a natural consequence of menopause the fullness of the labia minora thin and become more fragile; a condition noted as vulvar atrophy.

Keirá Feminine to soothe labia/vulva skin.

Keirá Feminine to soothe labia/vulva skin.

Both Sjögren’s Syndrome and menopause diminish natural secretions of vulvar skin. A lack of moisture in the labia minora** results in a dry, raw uncomfortable feeling in the vulvar area. Dry labia skin has diminished protective function and altered micro flora which can lead to other vulvar conditions (discomfort).  Keira Feminine Ointment is a non hormonal therapeutic that supports vulva moisture and labia fullness. Keira is a medicinal therapeutic developed specifically for women with chronic vulvar skin conditions. CLICK HERE to learn more about Keira Feminine Ointment.

Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same. Emily Bronte

Kathá Soma skin therapeutics are for people with vulnerable and troubled skin. Our naturally derived, nutrient enriched skin care formulas penetrate the top (epidermis) and middle (dermis) skin layers to protect and renew skin.

Katha Tibet logoDISCLAIMER The content presented within the Kathá Soma website is not intended as or should be construed as medical advice. Please consult with a healthcare practitioner for individual medical recommendations. Kathá Soma Consumer Health USA/2015-16